Jean’s Gospel: Temptation

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7 Responses

  1. Jean says:

    The above article is heavily influenced by a bible study given by Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the manuscript of which was later published in a stand alone book, titled, Temptation, and also in a two-study book, titled: Creation and Temptation: Two Biblical Studies.

    Bonhoeffer’s study is the best concise, yet immensely deep, treatment of the topic of temptation that I have found anywhere. My article captures many of Bonhoeffer’s insights, but there is much that space limitations did not allow me to include.

    For anyone wishing to go even deeper into the topic of temptation, a link to the book is below. There are a lot of used copies available too on Amazon, which make the price of the book de minimis.

    https://www.amazon.com/Creation-Fall-Temptation-Biblical-Studies/dp/0684825872/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1536250517&sr=8-2&keywords=Bonhoeffer+Temptation

  2. JoelG says:

    Thank you Jean.

    Satan knew this was Jesus:

    “the only Son of God,
    begotten from the Father before all ages,
    God from God,
    Light from Light,
    true God from true God,
    begotten, not made;
    of the same essence as the Father.
    Through him all things were made.
    For us and for our salvation.”

    In light of this it is fascinating that Satan thought he had a chance with Jesus in the Flesh. Jesus’ human nature didn’t make Him any less God. Yet apparently Satan thought it did.

    Just some random thoughts…

  3. Jean says:

    Agree Joel. Satan gave it his best shot and failed. He also tempted him at the end of Jesus’ earthly ministry, both in the Garden of Gethsemane and on the cross. Through it all, Jesus was obedient to the will of his Father, even death on a cross, for us.

  4. The New Victor says:

    “In light of this it is fascinating that Satan thought he had a chance with Jesus in the Flesh. Jesus’ human nature didn’t make Him any less God. Yet apparently Satan thought it did.”

    I’ve always found this interesting. Either Satan really didn’t comprehend who exactly Jesus was; or Jesus, being tempted in the form of a servant, really had the choice to sin (and thus fail) in the flesh. If not, then it really wasn’t temptation, yes? Or…

  5. Jean says:

    I believe in a full fledged incarnation. And, pertaining to temptation, the following: “For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin.”

    And: “who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross.”

    I do not believe Jesus’ earthly ministry was a charade. I think he lived by the Word of God and was faithful to the will of his Father. This meant enduring suffering and temptation, yet without sin, but also without avoiding it by exercising his divinity. His prayers in the Garden of Gethsemane and cry of dereliction from the cross testify to the reality of what Jesus suffered for us.

  6. JoelG says:

    “Jesus, being tempted in the form of a servant, really had the choice to sin (and thus fail) in the flesh. If not, then it really wasn’t temptation, yes?”

    This seems to speak to the question:

    “Although he was a Son, He learned obedience through what He suffered.” Heb. Five:8

    In addition, “angels came and were ministering to him.”

  7. Jean says:

    Asking whether Jesus had a choice to sin is like asking whether Adam had a choice to sin. Adam was innocent, without a corrupted human nature.

    The important thing is that Jesus was the faithful Israelite, God’s Suffering Servant. He chose not to sin, but for us became the greatest sinner of all time by bearing the sins of humanity in his flesh as the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world. That is indisputable; that is the Gospel. May God be praised!

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