Open Blogging

You may also like...

20 Responses

  1. David H says:

    First.

  2. David H says:

    Have a blessed day.

  3. Dan from Georgia says:

    I second that!

  4. JoelG says:

    “We are above all things loved–that is the good news of the gospel–and loved not just the way we turn up on Sundays in our best clothes and on our best behavior and with our best feet forward, but loved as we alone know ourselves to be, the weakest and shabbiest of what we are along with the strongest and gladdest.” – Buechner

  5. Duane Arnold says:

    Just a reminder, March 24 is the anniversary of the martyrdom of Archbishop Oscar Romero… https://youtu.be/21CN815v2G0

  6. Jean says:

    “We shall confess—he shall build. We shall preach—he shall build. We shall pray—he shall build. We do not know his plan. We do not see whether he builds or tears down. It may be that the times, which by human standards are times of collapse, are for him the times of great building. It may be that the times, which by human standards are times of great success, are for him the times to tear down. It is a great comfort that Christ gives to his church: confess, preach, and bear witness to me. I alone will build as it pleases me. Don’t give me orders. Do your job—then you have done enough. You are all right. Don’t’ seek out reasons and opinions. Don’t keep judging. Don’t keep checking again and again to see if you are secure. Church, remain a church! But, you, church—confess, confess, confess! You have only one Lord—Christ alone. By his grace alone you live. Christ builds.”

    – Dietrich Bonehoeffer

  7. Duane Arnold says:

    #6 Jean
    I’ve always loved that quote, especially “Church, remain a church!” Thanks for posting it.

  8. Jean says:

    Duane,

    I’ve got a book by Romero, The Violence of Love. It’s chilling. There’s something quotable on every page.

  9. Duane Arnold says:

    Jean

    You’ve got the best. If you decide you want more, let me know. His story is remarkable. I think, in some ways, it is the story of our times…

  10. Michael says:

    Chuck Berry has died at the age of 90.

  11. Dan from Georgia says:

    Wow. That is sad. What a legend Chuck Berry was.

  12. Michael says:

    It freaks me out even though he was 90.
    Jerry Lee and Little Richard are all that’s left and Richard is not well.

    This man was a genius.

  13. Jean says:

    The Perspicuity of Scripture:

    “Not men illumine Scripture, but Scripture illumines men. ‘Thy Word is a lamp unto my feet and a light unto my path’ (Ps. 119:105).

    According to Scripture, the perspicuity of Scripture consists in this, that it presents, in language that can be understood by all, whatever men must know to be saved.”

    – Francis Pieper

  14. Steve Wright says:

    Curious from the different denominational representations what your church’s perspective is towards Jerome’s Latin Vulgate translation. Especially curious to hear from Duane and Xenia, as well as what Michael might know about Calvin’s use/interaction with it. Thank you.

  15. Duane Arnold says:

    #14 Steve

    First of all, I don’t hold to the Council of Trent which essentially enshrined the Vulgate. Secondly, the English version is a translation (obviously) with all the issues of any translation.
    That being said, the Latin of the Vulgate is readable, elegant and precise in 98% of the text. The 2% that is difficult has to do with difficult passages in the Greek, Aramaic and Hebrew. The problem we have, is that we do not know the mss. tradition of the Vulgate. We do know that Jerome had remarkable access to a variety of mss. (especially during his time in Bethlehem) many of which are now lost to us (at least that is what we presume). So, in the end we have to make comparisons to the Nestle Aland NT, the LXX and the current Masoretic Hebrew text.
    The Anglican Communion does not have a position on any translation. From a personal point of view, I make use of the Challoner revision of the Douay–Rheims English translation from time to time simply as a comparison text/translation…

  16. Xenia says:

    The Eastern Orthodox use the LXX, for various reasons.

  17. Steve Wright says:

    We do know that Jerome had remarkable access to a variety of mss. (especially during his time in Bethlehem) many of which are now lost to us (at least that is what we presume). So, in the end we have to make comparisons to the Nestle Aland NT, the LXX and the current Masoretic Hebrew text.
    ————————————-
    Duane, your reply mirrors my thoughts on it. I especially note what you wrote which I paste above.

    I ask because there is a specific NT verse that has a variant with a lot of textual support. I think all the major English versions use the Nestle Aland text, but Jerome used the variant in his translation.

    Interestingly, in the apparatus the grade is only a B, which means there is legitimate dispute. The ESV makes a footnote on this as well.

    Thus, was curious of your insights.

    Xenia, what do you use for the New Testament?

  18. Duane Arnold says:

    #17 Steve
    BTW, the Aramaicisms in Jerome tend to be especially problematic. It is uncertain if the difficulty is in the mss. being used, or Jerome being weaker in Aramaic, or whether he went from Aramaic, to Hebrew (closest to the Aramaic), then to Greek and finally Latin…

  19. Xenia says:

    Steve, the Orthodox Study Bible uses the New King James Version for the NT. The King James Version is read aloud in church.

    For private reading, all versions are acceptable except those written w/ a particular Protestant slant, such as the NIV.

    For private study, The New Oxford Annotated Bible w/ Apocrypha is sometimes recommended. It is the New Revised Standard Version.

  20. Steve Wright says:

    Thanks again, Xenia and Duane. 🙂

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.